Wednesday, November 20, 2002

more fate

enemy of the people
monstrous
technology, fate & chance
contemplated as one becomes a creature
a mythological automata of causeless chance
the consequences of resourcefulness moving remorselessly
ruled by exterior forces
programmed & wired
not free nor fated
freedom falling back into fate
violence
seeking a linear model of morality

One Art Elizabeth Bishop
The art of losing isn't hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn't hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother's watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn't hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent. I miss them, but it wasn't a disaster.

--Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture I love) I shan't have lied. It's evident the art of losing's not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.