Friday, February 11, 2005

"Ridley is prepared for the fact that some people will be shocked by Mercury Fur, but he is also keen to pose a question: "Why is it that it is fine for the classic plays to discuss - even show - these things, but people are outraged when contemporary playwrights do it? If you go to see King Lear, you see a man having his eyes pulled out; in Medea, a woman slaughters her own children. The recent revival of Iphigenia at the National was acclaimed for its relevance. But when you try to write about the world around us, people get upset. If I'd wrapped Mercury Fur up as a recently rediscovered Greek tragedy it would be seen as an interesting moral debate like Iphigenia, but because it is set on an east-London housing estate it is seen as being too dangerous to talk about. What does that say about the world we live in? What does it say about theatre today?""(Guardian Unlimited | The devil inside )

:: note :: . . . theater is dominated by those involved in entertainment/experience economy . . . only sanctioned experiences underpinning a safe world view are allowed . . . don't threaten . . . despite the euologizing Miller will be but a footnote in the annuals of theater history . . .