Monday, August 30, 2004

"In "Painting as an Art," Richard Wollheim identifies the experience of seeing-in as prior to representation, which involves the perception of, say, marks on a surface that can also be perceived as things apart from each other. This aspect of seeing-in is called twofoldedness; everyone knows this, for example, from the simple pleasure of looking at clouds and seeing people, animals, cars, etc. Wollheim insists that the experience of twofoldedness is not either/or, a switching back and forth from one image to another. Instead the viewer sees, experiences, and holds these images simultaneously. I wonder, however, if it's possible to experience trifoldedness, octafoldedness, or a multifoldedness wherein an image can provoke a number of simultaneous associations that the viewer holds, cycles through, balances and interrelates. An open image, then, would be most successful not only when it allowed viewers to see-in and experience a range of associations, but when the range of associations are simultaneously full and complex visual, sensual, emotional, and intellectual responses."(Chris Ashley | "Painting Conveys So Much Spirit": George Lawson's San Cai Paintings)

:: note :: . . . writing about a body of work which I would love to use as a model to write about a body of music that is dear to my heart . . . "open image" / open music / improvisation . . . a process of seeing-in / listening-in / acting-in . . . wondering how fluid the vocabulary is between visual art - music - theater . . .