Monday, May 24, 2004

"Two points: First, the professionalization and specialization that has affected all of American academe has affected the profession of the theater practitioner as well. While this has provided the American theater with a huge pool of trained talent, it's also shut out those practitioners who may not have those academic credentials. Graduate schools are not merely training grounds; they're also informal communities, networking opportunities, not to mention indocrination centers for the ideological and aesthetic shibboleths of the current reigning academic stars. (Honestly, I don't mean this in a negative way; any community tries to instill common values. It's in the nature of community itself. But it can be stultifying to those who are outside of the community or to those who may disagree with the common values of that community.) You learn to walk the walk, talk the talk. There is privilege to this."(culturebot | The Economics of Theater |From George Hunka)


:: note :: . . . priviledge yes . . . practitioners practice whether watched or recognized . . . communities exist and training occurs outside the reigning stars . . . look&find . . .