Tuesday, January 20, 2004

"'Dialogue,' says philosopher Martin Buber, 'is a conversation between adults the outcome of which is unknown.' True dialogue requires valuing the other's needs equally with our own, not less and not more. This entails a few steps. First, internally, dialogue requires translating our judgments into our own feelings and needs[~]which give rise to our judgments. Then, when speaking, dialogue requires expressing those feelings and needs openly. After expression, sometimes even before, dialogue requires a willingness to listen with empathy. Such listening makes it possible to absorb the difficult messages we hear in a way that maintains the humanness of the other, does not challenge without threat to the needs we identify in us. This is what Buber refers to more than any aspect of the dialogue; it is this willingness which enables us to go beyond predictable outcomes and encounter the unknown-ness of the other person."("no enemies, no demands" by miki kashtan)


:: note :: . . . encounters of the unknown-ness of the other . . .