Wednesday, September 03, 2003

* The teacher rarely tells students what he thinks.

* Generally, he does not accept a single statement as an answer to a question.

* He encourages student-student interaction as opposed to student-teacher interaction, generally avoids acting as a mediator or judging the quality of ideas expressed.

* His lessons develop from the responses of students and not from a previously determined "logical" structure. (Postman & Weingartner, 1969, p. 33-36)

* Generally, each of his lessons pose a problem for students.

* He rarely summarizes the positions taken by students on the learnings that occur. He recognizes that the act of summary or "closure" tends to have the effect of ending further thought.

"* He rarely summarizes the positions taken by students on the learnings that occur. He recognizes that the act of summary or "closure" tends to have the effect of ending further thought."(Teaching as a Subversive Activity: Book Review)
(via Incorporated Subversion: JAMES FARMER : XPLANA)


:: note :: . . . when in times of reflection/beginning find the 'golden oldies' return . . .